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  Trip Report: D&S Winter Photographers' Special - Chapter 5
  San Juan Extension
What's Left 40 Years Later
  From: D&S Winter Photographers' Special Dates: Feb 26, 2005 Author: Nathan Holmes


Photo 73
The grade seen winding through the brush just east of the Piedra River bridge.
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Photo 74
The Piedra River bridge, constructed in 1962 when the Navajo reservoir flooded the line about a mile south of here
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Photo 75
Another view of the bridge. Today it's part of a walkway through a park and wildlife viewing area
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Photo 76
Beyond the bridge, the right of way has been turned into a dirt road until near Carracas.
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Photo 77
Where the two separate again, occasional hints of the former railway can be seen, such as these trestle bents outside Carracas.
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Photo 78
The next remnant is the most remarkable on the line - the nearly-intact siding, bridge, and tank at Pagosa Junction. This is Southern Ute Indian property.
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Photo 79
No idea how long this tank will survive - it's deteriorated significantly since the last time I saw it.
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Photo 80
This lone gondola (DRGW 536) sits on the siding at Pagosa Junction.
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Photo 81
Looking west across the truss bridge. The Pagosa branch used to wye off on the other side of the bridge, but the rails stop at the west end of the bridge.
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Photo 82
West of Pagosa Junction, the grade can be seen following the river where the road didn't bulldoze it under.
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Photo 83
At Juanita, there are two bridges. There's a multi-span bridge crossing the San Juan River, and then this typical truss, which crosses the Navajo River, which splits off the San Juan here.
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Photo 84
Beyond Juanita, it's seven miles to Navajo. However, the road is a muddy sinkhole, so I drove all the way around. At Navajo is a nicely preserved tank and another bridge.
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Photo 85
Next is Dulce (pronounced Dull-see by the locals). Here remain two stock cars, DRGW 5792 and DRGW 5794. Supposedly there's a freight house here, to, but I didn't see it.
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Photo 86
East of Dulce is Lumberton, where there used to be a small yard, and the branch up towards Chromo split off. That's the grade - the lump to the left of the road.
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Photo 87
The next stop east is Monero, and on the way one can clearly see the right of way cut into the hillside on the left.
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Photo 88
South of the US 64 - US 84 junction at Biggs, one can see the old grade snaking through the snow.
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Photo 89
Between Biggs and Chama, the line crosses the Continental Divide on a rather non-descript hump in the ground. However, the old grade can still be seen north of the highway in many places.
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Photo 90
The west end of the Cumbres & Toltec is somewhere under that snow, and beyond that starts the 107 abandoned miles into Durango.
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Creative Commons License This work is copyright 2005 by Nathan D. Holmes (maverick@drgw.net), but licensed under a Creative Commons License. This allows and encourages others to copy, modify, use, and distribute my work, without the hassle of asking me for explicit permission or fear of copyright violation. I encourage others to consider CC or other Open Content-style licensing of their original works.

All photographs in this trip report were taken with a Canon EOS 10D using either a Canon 28-105mm USM or a Canon 75-300mm f4-5.3 IS/USM.